Map showing the Conference location, the Isle of Wight, south coast, UK
View from Gore Cliff west to Blackgang, Isle of Wight, UK

Technical Programme

During the Conference 55 papers were presented, during 8 technical sessions. A selection of the presentations are now available to view as pdf files.


Opening Session
Session Chairman : Dr. Robin McInnes OBE

Presentations available to view:


Session 1 : Experience of the historical impacts of climate change on natural hazards (including global case studies and meteorologically-induced disasters)
Session Chairman : Dr. Christophe Bonnard

Recent years have seen an increased frequency of extreme weather events and there is concern that this trend is likely to continue. In order to determine how the impacts of climate change are likely to affect the timing and frequency of natural hazard events, it is important to consider evidence of how climate change and natural hazards have been linked in the past.

Presentations available to view:


Session 2 : Facing the challenge – landslides (and other natural hazards) and climate change

Session Chairman : Prof. Thomas Glade
In both coastal and inland locations, the occurrence of landslide events can be linked to meteorological conditions. Changes in our climate will have an impact on landslide hazards and vulnerable communities will face increasing risks in future years. It is essential to investigate, asses and evaluate the relationship between landslides (and other natural hazards) and climate change in order to find effective management solutions and improve preparedness for the future.

Presentations available to view:


Session 3 (Double Session) : Advances in hazard modelling and prediction (short and long-term)

Session Chairman : Dr. Roger Moore
One of the most important ways of reducing risks arising from natural events is to continue to develop a ‘culture of prevention’ (ISDR, 2002). Hazard monitoring and modelling, as well as prediction of hazard events, is a rapidly advancing field of science and there are many new techniques being developed as well as challenges of data management. Improving prediction of natural hazards is essential in order to reduce the impact of these events on vulnerable communities.

Presentations available to view:


Session 4 : Experience of landslide hazard and risk management and better practices for the future

Session Chairman : Dr. Eric Leroi
A coordinated approach to landslide management (whether rapid events or slow-moving phenomena) is essential and successful landslide hazard management should inform the planning and political processes. A review of landslide management in the context of climate change impacts examines how managers are incorporating climate change data into risk management strategies. For those responsible for managing risk in vulnerable locations, a critical issue is to develop solutions for improved management. It is also crucial to effectively communicate information clearly to both technical and non-technical audiences. There are many examples of good practice solutions to hazard management and it is important to exchange ideas and share expertise on these issues.

Presentations available to view:


Session 5 : Isle of Wight Case Studies

Session Chairman : Prof. Eddie Bromhead
An insight into instability investigations, management and remedial measures, on the Isle of Wight. In light of the predicted climate change scenarios and increasing instability, the provision of new information in high-risk areas such as the Isle of Wight can assist planners and managers in preparing for the future.

Presentations available to view:


Session 6 : Responding to climate change impacts at the coast

Session Chairman : Dr. Roger Moore
The predicted impacts of climate change present significant challenges to future coastal and geohazard management and will pose increased levels of risk to many communities and assets. It is essential to carry out research into climate change impacts now, so that appropriate proactive decision-making can be implemented through the planning process in the coastal zone to control or reduce risk.

Presentations available to view:


Session 7 : Safer societies and sustainable communities
Session Chairman : Mr. Ashley Curzon

Through effective risk management and informed, forward-looking planning decisions, we are endeavouring to improve the safety and sustainability of our communities. The insurance industry is also playing an important role in hazard management, but to the industry natural hazards are an ever- burgeoning issue. These issues must be considered in the context of the impacts of climate change.

Presentations available to view:


Session 8 : Risk governance - making better planning policies and decisions

Session Chairman : Dr. Brian Marker OBE
The most effective way of combating losses is to incorporate natural hazards into the land-use planning framework, placing constraints on development of land where there is deemed a high degree of risk, and by guiding development to the most suitable locations. Robust and transparent evidence is required to support planning policy development. In view of the impacts of climate change, planners and developers should be working together with engineers to ensure that planning guidance takes full account of natural hazards now and in the future.
Presentations available to view:


Undercliff Drive A3055 road failure, Isle of Wight, UK
Gore Cliff rockfall and mudslide, Isle of Wight, UK
Blackgang landslide, Isle of Wight, UK
View from Gore Cliff west to Blackgang, Isle of Wight, UK
Undercliff Drive A3055 road failure, Isle of Wight, UK
Gore Cliff rockfall and mudslide, Isle of Wight, UK
Blackgang landslide, Isle of Wight, UK
View from Gore Cliff west to Blackgang, Isle of Wight, UK
Undercliff Drive A3055 road failure, Isle of Wight, UK
Gore Cliff rockfall and mudslide, Isle of Wight, UK
Blackgang landslide, Isle of Wight, UK
View from Gore Cliff west to Blackgang, Isle of Wight, UK
Undercliff Drive A3055 road failure, Isle of Wight, UK
Gore Cliff rockfall and mudslide, Isle of Wight, UK
Blackgang landslide, Isle of Wight, UK
View from Gore Cliff west to Blackgang, Isle of Wight, UK
Undercliff Drive A3055 road failure, Isle of Wight, UK
Gore Cliff rockfall and mudslide, Isle of Wight, UK
Blackgang landslide, Isle of Wight, UK